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The conservation work in 2014 is being supported by these organisations.

BARRINGTON ENERGY USAGE
The Church of England estate has set itself the target of reducing its carbon footprint to 80% of its current usage by the year 2050. That may seem a long way off but we have to start somewhere and communities around the world are already suffering loss of land and some islands can no longer be lived on due to sea level rises that most people say are caused by human energy consumption and its creation of CO2.

Rural churches only produce a small part of energy consumption within the National CofE picture but every little reduction helps.

Barrington which is classed as a Medium sized church has been monitoring its usage for a number of years now and Barrington works to the standards set for Best Practice usage. In other words uses a minimum of energy to function, with very little wastage.



BATS
All Saints Barrington has hosted bats for as long as can be remembered and from time to time various bat enthusiasts have been invited to determine what types of bat frequent the church and where they roost. Droppings on the floor and around the Font suggest that the roosting places are behind the roof beams at each end of the Chancel and Nave. Certainly there has been no evidence of roosting in the tower, and the installation of a new steel frame lower down the tower than the 1872 installation, was unaffected. Evidence of bats feeding in the tower has though continued.

Natural England were contacted early in this project and Dr Duncan Painter, visited on a number of occasions and was able to report that the intended works were unlikely to prejudice the batís use of the church. One visit included the setting up of sophisticated monitoring equipment, round and in the church, with six youth club members and leaders plus members of the PCC doing a dusk-time bat watch. The report was:

That a total of nine common pipistrelle Pipistrellus pipistrellus were witnessed emerging from the church on the evening of 30 May 2014, with the majority of the bats first emerging from roosts inside the church from 21.16 (8 minutes after sunset). The bats then left the church over the period 21.22-21.36 from the tower (two bats), the north facing nave roof (five bats) and the porch on the south side (two bats).

Individual common pipistrelle bats recorded foraging in the church grounds, but particularly near to the tower from 21.38-22.01.

The calls of a Myotis bat species were also recorded inside the church at 21.54, confirming the roost of a second bat species inside the church.

A single soprano pipistrelle Pipistrellus pygmaeus bat was recorded by a detector located outside the church on the north west corner of the building at 21.08 (at sunset) and could have also emerged from a roost on the outside of the church.

The total number of common pipistrelle bats seen suggests the possible presence of a small maternity roost of this species inside the church.

Further work is needed at dawn inside the church to establish roost locations and more information on the Myotis bat roost.




BEES
There appears to be some sort of fossilized bivalve shell in the clunch and masonary bees seem to be building in them.


This page updated 04.07.14